Tornado watch posted for part of CT, severe storms expected

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    The Storm Prediction Center has placed Connecticut in an “enhanced risk” for severe thunderstorms this afternoon into this evening on Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020. “Severe thunderstorms are likely with damaging wind gusts of 60 mph or higher, along with large hail as the primary threats. An isolated tornado is also possible along with brief heavy rainfall,” the National Weather Services.

    The Storm Prediction Center has placed Connecticut in an “enhanced risk” for severe thunderstorms this afternoon into this evening on Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020. “Severe thunderstorms are likely with

    The Storm Prediction Center has placed Connecticut in an “enhanced risk” for severe thunderstorms this afternoon into this evening on Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020. “Severe thunderstorms are likely with damaging wind gusts of 60 mph or higher, along with large hail as the primary threats. An isolated tornado is also possible along with brief heavy rainfall,” the National Weather Services.

    The Storm Prediction Center has placed Connecticut in an “enhanced risk” for severe thunderstorms this afternoon into this evening on Thursday, Aug. 27, 2020. “Severe thunderstorms are likely with

    The Storm Prediction Center said “the greatest risk for severe weather will be along and south of the Interstate 90 corridor into the mid Hudson Valley and northwest Connecticut with large hail, damaging winds and isolated tornadoes possible.

    “The greatest threat for severe weather looks to be 1 pm to 8 pm. There continues to be some uncertainty how far north the severe threat will be from Albany northward due to a cooler and more stable air mass in place.”

    The Storm Prediction Center says Connecticut has an “enhanced risk” for severe thunderstorms this afternoon into this evening.

    The National Weather Service said “the environment is favorable for a few severe storms that are more intense than usual.”

    “This could cause widespread tree and power line damage and resultant power outages. Structural damage is also possible.”

    Large hail: “Potential golf ball-sized hail or greater. This could result in damage to motor vehicles and other property.”

    Hurricane Laura pounded the Gulf Coast for hours with ferocious wind, torrential rains and rising seawater as it roared ashore over southwestern Louisiana near the Texas border early Thursday, threatening the lives of people who didn’t evacuate.

    The National Hurricane Center says Laura intensified rapidly before plowing into land with sustained winds of 150 mph.

    Laura is expected to weaken as it moves northeastward in the Mississippi, lower Ohio and Tennessee vallies and Mid-Atlantic states on Friday and Saturday.

    The National Weather Service says it’s too early to say exactly how much rainfall Connecticut could receive from Laura’s remnants.

    “Some of the moisture appears to become entrained into a developing surface low ahead of short-wave energy tracking form the Upper Great Lakes into New England, and the added moisture could pose a low-end flash flood threat across portions of the Northeast as well. There is some spread concerning just how much moisture becomes entrained into the system over New England.”

    Most of Fairfield County and the western border of New Haven County have no dry conditions.


    SOURCE: https://www.w24news.com

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